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How Much Gas Does A Snowblower Use?

Shoveling snow during the winter is difficult for everyone. No one like to shovel snow.

Many people will use a snowblower to make the snow removal process much easier.

But it comes at a cost.

Not only do you need to factor in the price of the snowblower, but if you have a gas snowblower, you will need to buy gas for it.

The price of gas these days is very high and although it may not seem like a snowblower will use much gas, the price can really add up if you use it on a regular basis.

This article will show you how much gas a snowblower uses along with the cost.

man using a snowblower in driveway

How Much Gas Does A Snowblower Use?

The amount of gas a snowblower uses will depend on a few factors. The type of snowblower, the weather conditions, how hard the snowblower needs to work, driveway size, and how long the snowblower is running, are all factors that can affect the amount of fuel it uses.

On average, a 5-horsepower snowblower will use 0.5 gallons of fuel in 1.525 hours.

Here is how the math works:

A snowblower uses 0.4 pounds of fuel per horsepower per hour. A snowblower that has 5 Horsepower normally holds 0.5 gallons of fuel. Fuel weighs 6.1 pounds per gallon.

Multiply 0.4 lbs of fuel HP.HR x 5 HP = 2 pounds

0.5 gallons of fuel (tank size) = 3.05 lbs of fuel / 2 = 1.525 hours running time

Depending on the factors mentioned above, a 5 HP snowblower will burn 0.5 gallons of fuel in 1.525 hours or 91.5 minutes. If you have a small driveway, it may take you 30 minutes to remove the snow. Therefore you will use 0.164 gallons of fuel.

Keep in mind that some snowblowers are better than others with regard to how much gas they will burn. Some will burn a bit more and others less.

Fuel burn is something to consider before buying a snowblower. You may spend a bit more on the purchase of a snowblower if it burns less gas than others, but you can end up saving money over time as you will spend less on buying gas.

On average, a snowblower will use 0.4 pounds of fuel per horsepower per hour.

measuringstuff.com

How much does it cost to fill a snowblower with gas?

Depending on the cost of gas at the time of filling up, the total price can vary. But on average, the price of a gallon of gas in the USA is $3.75 per gallon.

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To fill a snowblower that holds 0.5 gallons, it will cost you $1.88.

If you are only running your snowblower for 30 minutes at a time, it will cost you less than $1.

I know that doesn’t seem like much but let’s look at the bigger picture.

snowblower sitting on a sidewalk

Depending on where you live, it can snow a lot over the winter. Sometimes every few days.

It’s possible that you could use your snowblower 2 or 3 times per week over a 5-month period during winter.

If you have a larger driveway or sidewalks to clear, you could run the snowblower for over an hour each time. This will use close to a full tank of gas every time you use it.

Knowing that the average snowblower will hold 0.5 gallons of gas which averages $2 to fill it, you could spend up to $6 every week on gas for your snowblower.

That’s $24 each month x 5 months = $120 per year. It can really add up fast.

If you have a larger snowblower that burns more gas than average, it will cost you even more.

man using a snowblower on a long driveway

What type of gas does a snowblower use?

The type of engine that your snowblower has will determine the type of gas it uses.

For example, a 2-stroke engine requires the gas to be mixed with oil.

If you use regular gas only in a 2-stroke engine, it can destroy the engine.

Most snowblowers use a 4-stroke engine that can run on regular gas only and does not need to be mixed. Regular unleaded 87-octane gas is fine.

gas pumps showing octane levels

You can fill a small jerry can at your local gas station with 87-octane regular unleaded gas for your snowblower. Some people choose to run higher octane gas but in most cases, it is not necessary.

Check with the owner’s manual ahead of time to confirm the type of gas required for your snowblower.

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